The one and only

Roger Federer The greatest of all time
Sophie Ebrard for Rolex

Sophie Ebrard for Rolex

Sophie Ebrard for Rolex.

Sophie Ebrard for Rolex.

September 30
1998 – Seventeen-year-old Roger Federer defeats Guillaume Raoux of France 6-2, 6-2 in the first round in Toulouse for his first ATP singles match victory. Rene Stauffer, in his book Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection, summarizes Federer’s achievement, “Yet, before the chase for the year-end No. 1 junior ranking reached its decisive phase, the unexpected happened. Federer achieved his first great breakthrough on the ATP Tour. With a ranking of No. 878, he traveled to Toulouse, France at the end of September and, to his own surprise, advanced through the qualifying rounds to progress into the main draw of the tournament. In only his second ATP tournament, the 17-year-old registered an upset victory over No. 45-ranked Guillaume Raoux of France—his first ATP match victory—allowing the Frenchman just four games. In the next round, Federer proved this win was not a fluke by defeating former Australian Davis Cup star Richard Fromberg 6-1, 7-6 (5). In the quarterfinals—his sixth match of the tournament including matches in the qualifying rounds—Federer lost to Jan Siemerink 7-6 (5), 6-2, with a throbbing thigh injury hampering him during the match. The Dutchman was ranked No. 20 and went on to win the tournament two days later, but Federer was also handsomely rewarded. He received a prize money check for $10,800 and passed 482 players in the world rankings in one tournament—moving to No. 396.”

Oh Roger, Look at you  now.

September 30

1998 – Seventeen-year-old Roger Federer defeats Guillaume Raoux of France 6-2, 6-2 in the first round in Toulouse for his first ATP singles match victory. Rene Stauffer, in his book Roger Federer: Quest for Perfection, summarizes Federer’s achievement, “Yet, before the chase for the year-end No. 1 junior ranking reached its decisive phase, the unexpected happened. Federer achieved his first great breakthrough on the ATP Tour. With a ranking of No. 878, he traveled to Toulouse, France at the end of September and, to his own surprise, advanced through the qualifying rounds to progress into the main draw of the tournament. In only his second ATP tournament, the 17-year-old registered an upset victory over No. 45-ranked Guillaume Raoux of France—his first ATP match victory—allowing the Frenchman just four games. In the next round, Federer proved this win was not a fluke by defeating former Australian Davis Cup star Richard Fromberg 6-1, 7-6 (5). In the quarterfinals—his sixth match of the tournament including matches in the qualifying rounds—Federer lost to Jan Siemerink 7-6 (5), 6-2, with a throbbing thigh injury hampering him during the match. The Dutchman was ranked No. 20 and went on to win the tournament two days later, but Federer was also handsomely rewarded. He received a prize money check for $10,800 and passed 482 players in the world rankings in one tournament—moving to No. 396.”

Oh Roger, Look at you  now.

federerblog:

In the 2008 Tennis Masters Cup, Roger Federer found himself down 4-5 against Andy Murray in the final set of their round robin match - a win for either would put them in first place in their group’s standings and through to the semifinals. A few weeks earlier Federer had cited a lower back injury forcing him to withdraw from the Paris Masters, which he carried into the tournament. Throughout the match Federer required three medicals time outs, and at one point needed to sit down in the linesperson’s chair as he awaited his opponents serve; organisers had told a driver to get Federer’s car ready because they expected him to retire. He went on to save seven match points in his ten-deuce service game, before Murray broke back to win 4-6 7-6(3) 7-5. After the match, when asked about the effect of the injury Federer responded, “I don’t quit once I step on court.” [x]

federerblog:

In the 2008 Tennis Masters Cup, Roger Federer found himself down 4-5 against Andy Murray in the final set of their round robin match - a win for either would put them in first place in their group’s standings and through to the semifinals. A few weeks earlier Federer had cited a lower back injury forcing him to withdraw from the Paris Masters, which he carried into the tournament. Throughout the match Federer required three medicals time outs, and at one point needed to sit down in the linesperson’s chair as he awaited his opponents serve; organisers had told a driver to get Federer’s car ready because they expected him to retire. He went on to save seven match points in his ten-deuce service game, before Murray broke back to win 4-6 7-6(3) 7-5. After the match, when asked about the effect of the injury Federer responded, “I don’t quit once I step on court.” [x]

(via set-point)